Linked Pages and Indexes

Friday, July 30, 2010

Ancestry.com's Shoebox

One of my favorite movies of all time is "The Princess Bride".  It has action, humor, romance and a little bit of mystery.  It is rather cheeky but still fun.  It also has a "pit of despair".  While Wesley and Buttercup run into the fire swamp to hide, they find rodents of unusual size, quick sand, and fire.  They successfully navigate the fire swamp but not without getting their feathers ruffled a bit or rather charred.  Once they exit the fire swamp, they are captured and Wesley is then taken to the "pit of dispair" for some torture and later escape. 

So why do I bring this up?  I relate the Ancestry.com Shoebox to the "pit of despair".  Not only does it present itself as great place to save or hide those documents that you think might match your family tree down the line, it gives one hope that you won't have to recreate the wheel of research to find them again.  I've been adding items to the Shoebox for months and now am up to 119.  I have not yet found rodents, quick sand, fire, or torture devices, but I have yet to navigate through and sort out my shoebox.  I started calling it a pit and then the name just rang so true from the movie.

I guess I need some motivation to go through and see if I have any treasures or just taunts.  Maybe some of those possible matching documents will escape.  As Nike used to say (and I just can't help this with a name like 'Shoebox'), JUST DO IT!.............ok maybe when i find time...

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Napa History

When I research the history of Napa, Napa County, Napa Valley, or Los Carneros, I find a recurring theme. That theme, and I’m not sure how to make this sound polite, is bias. As you can imagine everyone has their own take on history and those who author (or fund) a project do have a say in what is written.

I have my own bias and facts for my personal Napa family history. There’s nothing wrong with that. As an amateur genealogist (but an expert underwriter in my past life), I work hard to “source” my information to establish the facts. History, however, is full of influence by the individual who puts pen to paper, or in this day and age on the web.

So Napa Valley had or has the Wappo Indians, Padre Jose Altamira, Nathan Coombs, Nicholas Higurerra (and really that Mexican Land Grant doled out by General Vallejo), Catholic priests, Tulocay Cemetery and lots of wine.  Let’s not forget my Flanagan’s or the Stanly’s. I’ve also got my Borchers’, Vienop’s, McLaughlin’s and Maxwell’s. As you can see, my Napa history is skewed by my own bias.

Another point that I’d like to make is that the historcal information in Napa is only as plentiful and complete and those who have provided it. When I visit the Napa Valley Biographical and Genealogical Society pages, there are huge holes in the information. Also, I’m not sure that they have the manpower (or womanpower) to review information that is sent their way.

I blog away with my diary about my research available in cyberspace for anyone who wants to read about my version of Napa history and beyond.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

The Irish Settlement – Newport, New York – Part 4

WARNING - Later Posts may have more updated information and discoveries but it is best to read them in order.

You may be wondering about the Irish Settlement, what it was and where it was. I wonder the same thing. It is still there, I think. What I have gathered from reading about it online is that a very generous person gave the land to the Catholics of the area way back in the 1800s.

A gentleman by the name of Patrick Martin willed the property known at the Irish Settlement to the Catholic community on February 8, 1834. It consisted of 50 acres. One acre of the land was reserved for the cemetery (Old St. Patrick’s Cemetery).

When I map the Irish Settlement online I find it is around Newport Road, Butler Road/Route 88, and Hawthorne Road. The satellite view shows a still very rural upstate New York location. I’ve also found pictures of the cemetery at the location. Again, this is a very rural area in appearance even today.

I did find a house for sale in Newport, New York, near the Irish Settlement. It’s only $239,000 for 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, and a 1,704 square foot home. It looks like a gorgeous home online. It is definitely on acreage. I’d live there except for maybe not in the winter. I’m just not a snow person.

I would love to know more about the Irish Settlement and maybe even Patrick Martin. I’d also like to know exactly where my ancestors lived in the area. I hope to find this information someday.

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

The Irish Settlement – Newport, New York – Part 3

WARNING - Later Posts may have more updated information and discoveries but it is best to read them in order.

From what I understand of Irish immigrants in United States in the 19th century, discrimination and exclusion ran rampant. In my quest to find out more about the Irish Settlement of Newport, New York, I find little to no mention of it in writings from the 19th century. The 19th Century Newport information available online seems to talk about the British settlers and all that they did for the area once the “Crown” left the USA. I have found some information about the Irish Settlement online that has been written in the past twenty years but nothing in an official capacity. The closest I’ve found is written by a McLaughlin. I know that there are some published books out there.

I recently found some interesting information about Irish v. Scots-Irish in the United States that I really need to sit down and read. I had someone refer to my Maxwell surname as Scots-Irish. I now think that may not be correct or at least debatable. Scots-Irish are considered to be Protestants, not Catholics. My Maxwell’s were Roman Catholic. I will need to look into this topic further.

This leads me to my next topic about Newport’s Irish Settlement. My Irish immigrant families were Catholic. It was very much a part of their lives. I do respect that so much. These days people are not as inclined to hang on with the Catholic Church. I will leave it at that as I don’t want to make this blog about religion but rather about how my ancestors lived.

In 1839, St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church was built in Newport/Schuyler, New York. I’ve read other information that it is in the Town of Newport. Everything I’ve seen about my relatives indicates it does in fact have a Newport, New York address. The Village of Newport organized St. John's Roman Catholic Church in 1864. Mass was held in a house that was previously used by the Methodists.

A McLaughlin cousin has written a wonderful article about the history of these two churches and it can be found at http://herkimer.nygenweb.net/newport/stpatrick.html, History Of St. Patrick's and St. John's Parish. The article mentions several of my ancestors including Patrick McLaughlin, James Gartland, Thomas McLaughlin, Thomas Fox, Michael McLaughlin and James McLaughlin. It also mentions others who link into my tree like Michael Mahardy along with Spain’s, McMahon’s, Ward’s, and Daly’s. I don’t specifically have a McMahon on my tree but I find that family as sponsors along the way for baptisms. There’s some very interesting history in the article.

Another pertinent piece of information is that there were cemeteries for the Catholic churches. I have ancestors that were buried in both Old St. Patrick’s and at St. John’s Cemeteries. It is wonderful that someone has taken the time to post this information online.

To be continued……………

Monday, July 19, 2010

Mystery Cousin - Owen McLaughlin

The following is a quote from the 34 page document entitled, "The Descendants of Thomas McLaughlin" by researcher George Capes. I am placing this on my blog in hopes of someone finding it at some point and shedding some light on how Owen fits in with my McLaughlin's. We are pretty sure that he is related!

"OWEN McLAUGHLIN, is very probably, at least a close cousin to the McLaughlin Clan found in Newport, NY. He was involved in the early life of the Newport McLaughlin Family as early as 11 Jul 1830, when he and Maria Murtaugh sponsored the baptism of Rose Ann McLaughlin, the second daughter of Patrick McLaughlin and Bridget Murtaugh of Newport, NY., as recorded at Old St. John’s Church, Utica, NY. He is found again, on 06 Feb 1840, as a marriage witness, along with Margaret Daly, at the marriage of Thomas McLaughlin and Ellen Daly, as recorded at Old St. John’s Church, Utica, NY. Apparently he settled in Newport by 1830 and remained there until about 1838 when he moved to the Village of Newark, Town of Arcadia, Wayne Co., NY. It is difficult to locate him by using the Federal and New York State Census returns of that era, because only the head of household was listed, and he was not married until 1841. He was born in Co. Longford, IRE., on 20 Oct 1814, very probably a son of John and Mary Mc-Laughlin, who joined him in the Town of Arcadia by the 1850 Fed. Census. He may have had at least six siblings, using known associations, according to the various 1850, 1855 and 1860 Census.

He married on 07 Oct 1841, in the Town of Arcadia, to MINERVA ST. JOHN. Owen McLaughlin died 22 Aug 1881 in the T. of Arcadia, and bur. 25 Aug in Willow Ave. Ceme., Newark, NY. His wife, Minerva, was born on 09 Aug 1823 in the Hamlet of Fairville, Town of Arcadia, Wayne Co., NY., a daughter of Josia St. John and Rebecca Starkweather. She d. 02 Jul 1902 in T. Arcadia, Wayne Co., and was bur. 05 Jul in Willow Ave. Ceme., Newark, NY. Owen McLaughlin left a Will, dated 30 May 1867, and presented to Surrogates Court, as recorded on 08 Sep 1881.

Owen McLaughlin’s obituary appeared in the ‘Newark Union’ on Saturday, 27 August 1881, as follows :
“ Another Old Resident Gone. - Owen McLaughlin, who will be remembered as a cabinet maker in this village many years ago, died after a protracted and very painful illness, on Monday last, August 22nd. 1881, at his residence, three miles east of this village. Mr. M. came to this country 46 years ago, and lived a few years in Newport, Herkimer County. He became a resi-dent of this town 43 years ago, was married 40 years ago in October, and has lived on his farm 27 years. His age was 67 years at the time of his death. The funeral services were conducted by A. P. Burgess, from the residence, on Thurs-day. His surviving relatives reside mostly in California. Mr. M. was a man of eminently upright character, an obliging neighbor, and a very devoted husband and father. He will be greatly missed in the vicinity where he had so long lived.”

Minerva McLaughlin’s obituary appeared in ‘The Arcadian Weekly Gazette’ of 09 Jul 1902 as follows :
“ OBITUARY. – Mrs. Minerva McLaughlin died July 2 at her home east of Newark, aged 78 years and 11 months. Death came as a welcome release from many months of suffering and almost complete helplessness, during which, in spite of loving and tender care, she slowly grew worse. Mrs. McLaughlin was born in this town, near Fairville, and her whole life was spent in and near Newark. For 48 years she lived on the farm where she died. In 1841 she was married to Owen McLaughlin, a farmer, formerly an undertaker and dealer in furniture. He died several years ago. Mrs. McLaughlin was a member of the Presbyterian church, and of Newark Grange. She was a good consistent christian woman, a kind neighbor, a devoted mother. In her health, she endeared herself to many friends by her cheerfulness, energy, and friendliness. She was always bright, industrious and hospitable, entertaining her friends delightfully. Her pleasant greetings will long be remembered by old and young who were so fortunate as to know Mrs. McLaughlin before she became an invalid. She is survived by two daughters, Minerva and Jennie, and two sons, Josiah of Albany, and George H., of Newark. With the family should be mentioned D. E. Snyder, who has for many years managed the farm and been most faithful to the family and their interests in every possible way. The funeral was held Saturday afternoon, Rev. J. C. Ball, officiating, assisted by Rev. J. H. Robinson, a nephew. Interment was in Willow Avenue Ceme. with M. C. Welcher, J. E. Feller, O. E. Bishop and Michael Eckert acting as bearers.”

The 1850 Federal Census for the Town of Arcadia, Wayne County, New York, has the following entries :
pg. 250 / 251, dwelling # 1883, family # 1987, dated 25 Nov 1850 –

John McLAUGHLIN 71 marr. Farmer b. – IRE.

Mary “ 60 marr. - b. – IRE.

Patrick “ 18 single Boatman b. – IRE.

Morris “ 16 single Farmer b. – IRE.

Ann “ 12 single - b. – IRE.

pg. 292, dwelling # 2529, family # 2683, dated 18 Dec 1850 –

Owen McLAUGHLIN 36 marr. Cabinet maker b. – IRE.

Minerva “ 27 marr. - b. – N.Y.

John C. “ 6 single - b. – N.Y.

pg. 294, dwelling # 2570, family # 2777, (James Crosby Res.) dated 19 Dec 1850

Julia McLAUGHLIN 25 single (prob. servant) b. – IRE.

The 1855 New York State Census for the Village of Newark, Town of Arcadia, Wayne Co. NY has these entries:

Surname Name relation age yrs./town birthplace occupation

Pg. 40. BASSETT, Almon S. head 26 Y. 26 Y. Allegheny Cabinet maker

“ Marcella wife 31 Y. 10 Y. Ireland -

“ Charles J. child 2 Y. 2 Y. Wayne

“ George A. “ 1 Y. 1 Y. Wayne

McLAUGHLIN, Ann s-i-law 17 Y. 10 Y. Ireland -

pg. 64. McLAUGHLIN, Owen head 39 Y. 17 Y. Ireland Farmer

“ Minerva wife 31 Y. 31 Y. Wayne -

“ John child 11 Y. 11 Y. “

Pg. 65. McLAUGHLIN, John head 78 Y. 6 Y. Ireland Farmer

“ Mary wife 66 Y. 6 Y. Ireland -

It can be deduced from the above information that Marcella (McLaughlin) Bassett and her sister, Ann, both arrived in the Town of Arcadia about 1845. Their parents or grandparents, John and Mary McLaughlin arrived in the town about 1849 with Patrick and Morris. Julia McLaughlin is probably married by the time this 1855 census was taken.

The 1860 Federal Census for the Town of Arcadia, Wayne County, New York has the following entry :

pg. 87 / 971, dwelling # 1413

Owen McLAUGHLIN, 46 marr. Farmer $3,000./$600. b. – IRE.

Minerva “ 36 marr. - b. – N.Y.

Josiah “ 1 - - b. – N.Y.

John “ 83 marr. - b. – IRE.

Mary “ 72 marr. - b. – IRE.

John and Mary McLaughlin can only be accounted for by their presence in the 1850 Fed. Census, the 1855 NYS Cen-sus and also the 1860 Fed. Census. Their dates of death and burial locations are not known at this time.

The probable family of JOHN and MARY McLAUGHLIN is as follows :

i. OWEN McLAUGHLIN, b. 20 Oct 1814 in Co. Longford, IRE; d. 22 Aug 1881 in T. Arcadia, Wayne Co., NY; bur. 25 Aug in Willow Ave. Ceme., Newark, NY; m. 07 Oct 1841 in T. Arcadia to MINERVA ST. JOHN. ( this family will follow that of John & Mary McLaughlin)

ii. (poss.) MARCELLA McLAUGHLIN, b. c. 1823 in IRE; m. c. 1851 / 52 in T. Arcadia to ALMON S. BASSETT. She continued living in Newark until at least 1862. No Further Info.

iii. (poss.) JULIA McLAUGHLIN, b. c. 1825 in IRE. No Further Info.

iv. (poss.) WILLIAM McLAUGHLIN, b. c. 1828 in IRE; m. 18 Mar 1855 in Macedon, Wayne Co., NY., to MARY MELLEN. No Further Info.

v. PATRICK McLAUGHLIN, b. c. 1832 in IRE. (May be a grandchild.) No Further Info.

vi. MAURICE McLAUGHLIN, b. c. 1834 in IRE. (May be a grandchild.) No Further Info.

vii. ANN McLAUGHLIN, b. c. 1838 in IRE. (May be a grandchild.) No Further Info.

The known family of Owen and Minerva (St. John) McLaughlin is as follows :

i. JOHN C. McLAUGHLIN, b. 15 Jan 1844 in T. Arcadia, Wayne Co. NY.; d. 22 Aug 1860 in T. Arcadia, aged 17 years; bur. Willow Ave. Ceme., Newark, Wayne Co., NY.

ii. JOSIAH ST. JOHN McLAUGHLIN, b. 10 Oct 1858 in T. Arcadia, NY.; m. date unk. to ADDIE NAUMAN. They lived in Albany, NY., and later at Indianapolis, IN. Josiah seems to have died after 1920 and before Sep. of 1938. No Further Info.

iii. MINERVA McLAUGHLIN, b. 04 Jul 1860 in T. Arcadia, NY.; d. unmarried, 25 Sep 1938 in Vil. Newark, T. Arcadia; bur. 27 Sep in Willow Ave. Ceme., Newark, Wayne Co., NY. No Further Info.

Minerva’s obituary appeared in the Newark Union-Gazette on Wed. 28 Sep 1938 as follows :

“ Miss McLaughlin, Veteran Grange Member, Passes” – “Services for Miss Minerva McLaughlin, 78, native and active resident of Newark who died at her home here Saturday evening, Sept. 24, were held at 2:30 p.m. yesterday in Park Presbyterian Church. Miss McLaughlin was born in Arcadia on July 4, 1860, the daughter of Owen and Minerva St. John Mc-Laughlin, and had lived in this township her entire life. She taught for many years in district schools of the area, was for 53 years a member of Newark Grange, served 20 years as secretary of Wayne County Pomona Grange, was a charter member and past officer of Amitie chapter of Eastern Star, and a member of the Pres-byterian church. Prior to the church service, private rites were held in the Schulz Funeral Parlor. The church service was conducted by the Eastern Star. Burial was in Newark Cemetery. Surviving are a nephew, Owen C. Lincoln, Manhasset, L.I., and two cousins, Mrs. Gertrude Crennell, Rochester, and Miss Dora Robinson, New York City.”

iii. JANE / JENNIE ST. JOHN McLAUGHLIN, b. 03 Mar 1862 in T. Arcadia, NY.; d. 27 Mar 1911 in Newark, NY.; m. 08 Dec 1904 in Newark to ORION M. LINCOLN. He was b. 20 Apr 1855 in the T. of Arcadia, and d. 25 Aug 1927 in the Vil. of Newark. Jennie and Orion Lincoln had one son, Owen C. Lincoln, who was born c. 1906 in the Vil. of Newark. No Further Info.

v. GEORGE HENRY McLAUGHLIN, b. 20 Mar 1865 in T. Arcadia, NY.; d. unmarried, 01 May 1920 in Vil. of Newark, NY.; bur. 03 May in Willow Ave. Ceme., Newark, NY. No Futher Info.

George’s obituary appeared in the Newark Union-Gazette on Fri. 14 May 1920 as follows :
“OBITUARY” – “George H. McLaughlin. George H. McLaughlin, for many years a resident of this village, was found dead in the bathroom of his apartment in the Kelley Block on Saturday morning, May 1, 1920. Mr. McLaughlin was subject to attacks of asthma and was heard coughing severely at about 7 o’clock, and an hour or so later he was found dead on the floor of the bathroom. An investigation of his room and of the bath-room showed that he had a hemorrhage and had bled profusely in his room and had evidently gone to the bathroom to allow the blood to run in the bowl and had fallen there with exhaustion and died. Mr. McLaughlin was born in this town on 20 Mar 1865, and was, therefore, 55 years of age. He was the son of Owen and Minerva St. John McLaughlin, and was educated in the district schools, at the Newark A-cademy and at Geneseo Normal and was a member of the Methodist Church of Lyons. He is survived by a sister, Minerva McLaughlin of Newark; by a brother, J.S. McLaughlin, of Indianapolis, Ind; and by a nephew, Owen Lincoln. The funeral was held Monday afternoon, Rev. F. A. Boyd officiating. Burial was made in Willow Ave. Cemetery.” "

The Irish Settlement – Newport, New York – Part 2

WARNING - Later Posts may have more updated information and discoveries but it is best to read them in order.

Newport, New York was incorporated in 1857. It includes three churches, a grist mill, a saw mill, and several other historical buildings and residences. I find gristmills to be rather interesting. I know that they were common in Europe and carried over to the U.S. apparently peaking use in the 1840s. The term comes from the Old High German grist-grimmon. It means grain intended to be or that has been ground. It is a word that is also used in Old English from the Old Saxon grist-grimmon or gnashing of teeth. To have a gristmill, you need water to run the wheel. Based I what I have found about Newport, the West Canada Creek must have been that water source.

I bring up the mill because it helps me draw an even better picture in my mind of what this location may have looked like and been like in the early to mid 1800s. I have only been to two other gristmills. One of them is Gruene, Texas. It was a restaurant back in 1999. I have also been to the Old Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park in St. Helena. At that location, the mill is still functional and has milling demonstrations. Anyway, visiting a place like a gristmill is one way to get closer to what life might have been like in the 19th century.

Back to Newport……..The current village of Newport was purchased from a Daniel Campbell of New York City around 1788 by William, Ephraim, and Benjamin Bowen, of Newport, Rhode Island. I can’t seem to find who Campbell purchased it from though. In 1791, a Christopher Hawkins was the first permanent settler in the town but was evicted by Benjamin Bowen from his land. There were several other early settlers to the area previous to 1798 who obtained their land titles from the Commissioners of Forfeiture and from the Waltons, who had received a tract of 12,000 acres from the King in 1768. Maybe that answers my question as to where Campbell got the land.

It does sound like the Mohawk Indians were native to this area of upstate New York. I am still curious about the influence of the German names in this area. It would be interesting to know where these towns and the county got their names. The names certainly don’t sound British to me.

So even though Christopher Hawkins was evicted from Bowen’s land, he did not necessarily leave the area. He was originally from Providence, Rhode Island. I found a long interesting story online about Mr. Hawkins. Despite his eviction from Bowen’s land, he stuck around Newport, raised his family, and ended up in an elected position. The eviction story must have been just one big misunderstanding.

The Baptist church in Newport was the first church. My family is actually Roman Catholic so I have information to share about the Catholic churches in the area. Members of my family lines were definitely involved in the Church.

The population of the town of Newport in 1865 was 1,983. I am not sure how many people from the Irish Settlement made up that population but I am certain that they had their fair share.

To be continued…………..

Sunday, July 18, 2010

The Irish Settlement – Newport, New York – Part 1

WARNING - Later Posts may have more updated information and discoveries but it is best to read them in order.

The first time I saw the location named “Irish Settlement”, Newport, New York, I thought to myself, “What is that place? And, I want to know more!” I found this location listed on a family worksheet for my Maxwell’s. They had emigrated from County Meath, Ireland to Newport, New York, at the Irish Settlement.

In my search for information about the settlement in Newport, New York, I have found the term “Irish Settlement” used in other locations from Newport, New York to Des Moines, Iowa and in other locations around the world. The title still has an impact on me whenever I read it or say it. It speaks of community, family, neighbors, and a specific location for which I found my Irish immigrant relatives and not just one of my family surnames. I have found multiple family settlers there plus all of these other Irish immigrants who were their neighbors and friends. Sometimes I get so excited when people find me on Ancestry.com with all of my McLaughlin’s, Maxwell’s, and Gartlan’s up the line, I just want to share, share, and share my information. I try to keep my excitement under wraps a bit as to not scare off or overwhelm anyone.

I think I kind of overwhelmed this one gentleman. When we determined that his McLaughlin’s were the Newport Family (It was pretty obvious to me anyway.), I emailed him that 34 page document about the “Descendants of Thomas McLaughlin”. He thanked me but I haven’t heard back from him. Originally, he had indicated that he had limited time to work on his tree these days. There are probably over 300 people listed on those pages and I am only on page 29 after hours of review. I can imagine what other people think. I am still ever so grateful for the gentleman who assembled the document though. I’m still trying to reach him.

Anyway, back to Newport, New York………..Newport is actually referred to as the Town of Newport, New York and is located on the western edge of the county. It includes the village of Newport. Utica, New York is located to the northeast. According to the 2000 Census, there were just over 2,000 people living there at the time.

The size amazes me. I live in Sacramento where it is wall-to-wall people. There are over a million people in the Greater Sacramento Area. There is no separation between the city of Sacramento, the unincorporated area of Sacramento, Carmichael, Elk Grove, Citrus Heights, Fair Oaks, Rocklin, Roseville, Antelope, Orangevale and North Highlands. It is urban sprawl at its best and sometimes its worst.

Enough about where I live. Sometime after 1786, the first settlers took up stakes in the area of Newport. The town was formed April 7, 1806 from parts of Fairfield, Herkimer, Norway, and Schuyler. Now things are starting to click for me. A geography lesson definitely helps sometimes. Those four other cities are indicated all over my family tree and so is Utica. I do find it interesting that most of the names seem to have a German influence. I have also seen the name German Flatts mentioned in my research of this area.

So where did Newport get its name? Every time I try and do a Google Search for Newport without the state indicated, Newport, Rhode Island pops up leading the results. It probably comes as no surprise that Newport, NY is named after Newport, RI. Apparently many of the early settlers came from Rhode Island.

I found the following information online about the breakdown of Newport’s locations:

-Farrel Corner – A hamlet west of Newport Village

-Irish Settlement – A Hamlet near the south town line

-Martin Corner – A location near the west town line

-Middleville – Part of the Village of Middleville on Route 28 by the east town line and the West Canada Creek

-Newport – On Route 28 by the east town line and West Canada Creek

-Poland – South part of the Village of Poland near the northwest corner of town

-Old City – The east town line

-Welch Corners – The east town line, south of Old City

I think that is it for now for my geography lesson in this post. It helps me get my bearing on things for future discussions about this area. I would like to know more and it would appear I will be self taught from a far on this subject. I am hoping for some stories about what life was like in this location. I am open to any information about this area. I have one story that a Maxwell cousin provided about Middleville. I hope he writes more.

To be continued…………

Friday, July 16, 2010

My Family Surnames, Part 6

Every couple of posts, I plan to put this list of my surnames out here to keep the momentum going. Feel free to let me know if any of the names strike a cord.

1. Flanagan - Co. Louth, Ireland; Napa, California; Corning, California

2. McLaughlin - Ringowney, Parish of Edgeworthstown, Co. Longford, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York; Austin and Grass Valley, Lander County, Nevada; Napa, California

3. Maxwell - Shancarnan, Parish of Moynalty, Co. Meath, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York; Austin and Grass Valley, Lander County, Nevada; Napa, California

4. Shaffrey - Dunshaughlin, Parish of Moynalty, Co. Meath, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York

5. Gartlan - Co. Monaghan, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York

6. Fox - Co. Monaghan, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York

7. O'Brien - Castleconnell, Co. Limerick, Ireland; Australia; Napa, California

8. Hickey - Whitegate, Co. Clare, Ireland; New York City (Greenwich Village)

9. Coughlin - Co. Clare, Ireland; New York City, Long Island, and Rye, New York

10. McGuire - Co. Fermanagh; New York City (Brooklyn, Greenwich Village) and Long Island, New York

11. Bellew - Co. Louth, Ireland

12. Kirwan - Co. Louth, Ireland

13. Campbell - Co. Louth, Ireland

14. Maguire - Co. Louth, Ireland

I have more surnames too but these are the names that I am most actively searching and familiar with.

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Typos and Proofreading

Hello Out There! I just wanted to stop and make a quick comment about my Blog. I try hard to avoid typos and proofread things a few times over running spell and grammer check in Word. However, I miss things either because I go crossed eyed trying to re-read what I just wrote or because I type so fast or rather compose at the keyboard and type fast. Sometimes my fingers do keep up with my thoughts as fast as they come which in turn causes some mishaps. Feel free to let me know if I've got some "mess ups" out there. I majored in Business rather than English. I'm working on my writing though! Thanks.

Monday, July 5, 2010

Family Surnames of the Irish Settlement, Newport, New York - July 5, 2010

WARNING - Later Posts may have more updated information and discoveries but it is best to read them in order.

When you look up McLaughlin’s in Newport, New York’s Irish Settlement, you don’t get too far before you run into some Maxwell’s, Gartlan’s, and Fox’s. Those are my family surnames. Let me not forget to mention the Mahardy’s, Clifford’s, Drumm’s, Spain’s (Yes, they are Irish.), and a few others before I am done.

While the second batch of names is not my direct family line, they are cousins. I have about 30 Mahardy’s on my tree. I also have 6 Drumm’s, 7 Spain’s, and 17 Clifford’s. It gets even more interesting when you see multiple marriages between the families. After all they were all good Irish Catholics.

When I first embarked on researching my McLaughlin family line, I discovered that my great-great-grandfather, Thomas M. McLaughlin, was from New York. At first, that is all I knew of his origins. I initially assumed that he was from New York City. Can you see my eyes rolling back into my head? I had already run into so many problems researching my Hickey/McGuire/Romaine/Coughlin line in the Five Boroughs of New York City that I wanted to give up. I am not a quitter though. Thank goodness I kept going and found the Irish Settlement.

Based on what I've been able to find, the McLaughlin and Mahardy Families of Newport both came from Co. Longford, Ireland. It would appear that the families knew each other in that location. It also appears that the Gartlan's and Fox's knew each other in Co. Monaghan. It is not unusual for people from one community to follow each other to the next when we are talking about immigration in the the 1800s, especially from Ireland.

The more that I research my family tree in Newport, New York, the more family surnames cross my path. It is so interesting to see how people are connected.

The Montello, WI, Connection

WARNING - Later Posts may have more updated information and discoveries but it is best to read them in order.

McLaughlin, Murtaugh, Daly, Cowley, McNamee, Quantius, Duffy, Reardon, and Dalton, are just a few names that I run across as I review my McLaughlin Cousin’s Family Line in Montello, WI. I looked up Montello, WI, online wondering why so many Irish left Newport, New York’s Irish Settlement for Montello. I am assuming there was land and jobs. The weather was probably about the same in Montello and Newport. I’d be interested in knowing a little more.

The surnames listed above are not my direct lines, except McLaughlin. Everyone else is a cousin aligning with my McLaughlin’s. The Montello, WI, connection is so interesting as several from my family tree emigrated there. I wonder what life was like in this location. I also wonder how many of those researching their Irish families in Montello have a connection to the Irish in Newport, New York. My McLaughlin’s certainly do. The migration path would be interesting to trace. I can trace mine. I wonder just how many other people took the same path. It would be considered a path less traveled probably.

Saturday, July 3, 2010

The Duffy’s: It Starts with Newport, Herkimer County, New York

WARNING - Later Posts may have more updated information and discoveries but it is best to read them in order.

When I work on my McLaughlin Family Tree, I find Duffy’s in Montello, WI, with my McLaughlin Cousins. If you will, I will call them my McLaughlin Cousins since my direct line did not go to Montello but many relatives of the original lines of Newport McLaughlin’s did.

I also find Duffy’s in Napa, CA. Apparently Thomas M. McLaughlin and Phillip Duffy were childhood friends in Newport, New York. Thomas’ and Phillip’s wives were sisters. Ellen and Catherine Maxwell were from Newport, New York, having emigrated from Ireland. They went onto Austin, NV, and eventually moved to Napa, CA, where they spent the rest of their lives.

So are these two Duffy family groups related? I’m not sure but thought I’d post about it in case a Duffy is interested. I am only related to the Duffy’s by marriages in my family tree. I seem to have some information about the Duffy’s for both of these family groups. I have some information in the “34 page document” and I have some papers in “the box” that my mom brought me originating with a Malloy of Napa, CA.

A funny thing happens when you visit Ireland, too. In my case, I found a Duffy who is married to my Flanagan relative. It is less likely that they are of the same Duffy line. What a small world.

Friday, July 2, 2010

Are you looking for your ancestors in Newport, Herkimer County, New York?

WARNING - Later Posts may have more updated information and discoveries but it is best to read them in order.

This week has gone by so quickly with regular everyday life. My genealogy hobby has gotten some attention this week, of course. I had the opportunity to converse with someone who is interested in the Irish Families of Montello, WI, who originated in the Irish Settlement in Newport, Herkimer County, New York. While it does not appear that we are directly related, you never know if our families might have known each other. Let's just say there are enough McLaughlin's in both locations that it is likely. I provided him with some information sources that I have for searching in Newport, NY.

To start, there is or was a St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Newport, New York at the Irish Settlement. The cemetery is referred to as Old St. Patrick’s Cemetery. Before the church was there, the Catholics in the area went to St. John’s Church, Utica, New York. There’s a cemetery there too. Some of my relatives were involved in starting St. Patrick’s Church in Newport in 1834. I also see St. Mary’s in Little Falls, NY, indicated. Here’s a link to the history of the two parishes written by one of my McLaughlin relatives: http://herkimer.nygenweb.net/newport/stpatrick.html.

I have a few relatives buried in the Irish Settlement, Town of Newport, Cemetery at Old St. Patrick’s. Here’s link to apparently everyone who is buried there: http://herkimer.nygenweb.net/cemeteries/irishcem.html. I LOVE that someone put this online.

Here’s a link to the Town of Newport’s site online: http://herkimer.nygenweb.net/newport.html – This page links to pretty much everything. I’ve listed individual links above to other pages off this main one since sometimes the links error out. If you go directly to the page, it works for whatever reason. From this page you can find lists of everyone buried in the Newport Cemetery and the St. John’s Cemetery. This is pretty cool although I have found some of the information is incomplete. I have found several of my McLaughlin’s and Maxwell’s buried at St. John’s.

The other site that I’ve reviewed is http://herkimer.nygenweb.net/. This site may be redundant.

I’ve had a hard time getting back to this site but the link still works: http://montgomery.nygenweb.net/herksursE.html. The bottom of the page has links to all of the surname page ranges by last name for Herkimer and Montgomery Counties.

I thought I'd post this while it was still fresh in my mind.

Thursday, July 1, 2010

My Blog and My Website (www.zelsersk.net)

Originally posted in 2010

My blog has been active for a couple of weeks now and I noticed that I have a few followers. Thank you to my loyal followers. I have offered the link to others who are connected to my family tree, also. I was hoping for more comments and feedback from people. Then my husband attempted to sign-up to follow my blog. Because he did not already have some sort of account setup, he had to go through the process. It would appear that they don’t make it very easy. He is extremely technical on a computer and said that was a slow process, errorred at one point, and appeared to timeout. He eventually was able to sign-up. I hope that others have not had to go through that.

At this point, I plan to beef up my website and display a more prominent link to my blog. Maybe that is the answer. My goal with the blog is to generate interest from others of whom I am possibly related, discuss what Ancestry.com has to offer, and discuss other genealogy research options with maybe a little sense of humor. I love to have fun, share my success, and try to learn from situations that haven’t provided what I’m looking for on my family tree.

I guess my guiding principles in this endeavor are to communicate effectively, network with others, research successfully, and have fun! Can you tell that I worked in corporate America for over 15 years? I may come up with a mission statement too.

My Family Surnames, Part 5

Originally posted in 2010

Every couple of posts, I plan to put this list of my surnames out here to keep the momentum going. Feel free to let me know if any of the names strike a cord.

1. Flanagan - Co. Louth, Ireland; Napa, California; Corning, California

2. McLaughlin - Ringowney, Parish of Edgeworthstown, Co. Longford, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York; Austin and Grass Valley, Lander County, Nevada; Napa, California

3. Maxwell - Shancarnan, Parish of Moynalty, Co. Meath, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York; Austin and Grass Valley, Lander County, Nevada; Napa, California

4. Shaffrey - Dunshaughlin, Parish of Moynalty, Co. Meath, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York

5. Gartlan - Co. Monaghan, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York

6. Fox - Co. Monaghan, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York

7. O'Brien - Castleconnell, Co. Limerick, Ireland; Australia; Napa, California

8. Hickey - Whitegate, Co. Clare, Ireland; New York City (Greenwich Village)

9. Coughlin - Co. Clare, Ireland; New York City, Long Island, and Rye, New York

10. McGuire - Co. Fermanagh; New York City (Brooklyn, Greenwich Village) and Long Island, New York

11. Bellew - Co. Louth, Ireland

12. Kirwan - Co. Louth, Ireland

13. Campbell - Co. Louth, Ireland

14. Maguire - Co. Louth, Ireland

I have more surnames too but these are the names that I am most actively searching and familiar with.

My Surnames, Part 4

Originally posted in 2010

WARNING - Later Posts may have more updated information and discoveries but it is best to read them in order.

Every couple of posts, I plan to put this list of my surnames out here to keep the momentum going. Feel free to let me know if any of the names strike a cord.

1. Flanagan - Co. Louth, Ireland; Napa, California; Corning, California

2. McLaughlin - Ringowney, Parish of Edgeworthstown, Co. Longford, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York; Austin and Grass Valley, Lander County, Nevada; Napa, California

3. Maxwell - Shancarnan, Parish of Moynalty, Co. Meath, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York; Austin and Grass Valley, Lander County, Nevada; Napa, California

4. Shaffrey - Dunshaughlin, Parish of Moynalty, Co. Meath, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York

5. Gartlan - Co. Monaghan, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York

6. Fox - Co. Monaghan, Ireland; Newport, Herkimer County, New York

7. O'Brien - Castleconnell, Co. Limerick, Ireland; Australia; Napa, California

8. Hickey - Whitegate, Co. Clare, Ireland; New York City (Greenwich Village)

9. Coughlin - Co. Clare, Ireland; New York City, Long Island, and Rye, New York

10. McGuire - Co. Fermanagh; New York City (Brooklyn, Greenwich Village) and Long Island, New York

11. Bellew - Co. Louth, Ireland

12. Kirwan - Co. Louth, Ireland

13. Campbell - Co. Louth, Ireland

14. Maguire - Co. Louth, Ireland

Google Search

Originally posted in 2010

It is amazing what can be found online. With a simple Google Search of your family surname and the location in which they lived, you can have many, many pages of information show up. All of this information can lead you somewhere, right? I find that it compares to having a television service. You’ve got all of those channels, maybe hundreds, but there is nothing on.

Sometimes I’ve gotten lucky with my genealogy internet searches. I’ve found plenty of message boards out there including Ancestry’s and others. I didn’t realize that Ancestry’s message board would feed into a search engine but it does. The various message boards are a great way to network. I have found several outside of Ancestry and posted information.

Additionally, there is so much heraldry information on the web about individual surnames. I have accumulated plenty of information about Flanagan and McLaughlin enabling me to write my own general heraldry with the family crest about each name. Sometimes the heraldry information can lead you to some genealogy for your own family. It hasn’t quite worked out that way for me yet. I still give it credit.

I was able to find Shaffrey’s online in County Meath, Ireland. I emailed one person but they have very little about their family tree. Shaffrey is a rather uncommon Irish surname. It is found primarily in County Meath, Ireland, in the area of Kells, Moynalty, and Dunshaughlin. My search for that line has come to a slow crawl. I’m still working on that family line but internet searches have not turned up much lately. I do think that if I can specifically find my Maxwell line in Shancarnan, County Meath, which is also near Moynalty, that I will find some Shaffrey’s.

The search goes on. Everyday more and more information is placed on the internet. I will keep plugging away.

LDS Family History Library

I made two recent visits to the LDS Family History Library near my home in Sacramento. The hope of researching further back on some of my family lines is always on my mind when it comes to my family tree. I was not sure what to expect from the library but was very interested. During my first visit, I just intended to stop by and check the place out. A volunteer helped me by answering some of questions and giving me a quick tour. The place is pretty small but they have computers and microfilm/microfiche equipment in a separate room. They have fairly broad hours of operation (not open on the weekdend) and the library itself is free. They can order microfiche from Utah for you to view onsite. The cost is $6 and then it is there for you to view for a 3-4 week period of time. You can't take the film home with you. I'm not sure why you'd want to since the readers are located there. You can copy information off microfiche and they even have the ability for you to send the file to a computer in the room to upload the information onto a USB drive. My first visit gave me some hope.

My second visit was about a week and half later. I walked in ready to look up information in their card catalog and order some microfiche. I guess I should not have been so excited. Disappointment can run rampant in your search for your family tree. Sometimes I forgot that with all of the luck that I've had. A volunteer started to help me locate the available microfiche for my various families. The first thing that she had me do was go to www.familysearch.org. From there she had me look up the specific locations that my Irish families were from in Ireland. Searching by location does make a lot of sense. What I found was that the information only went back to the mid 1850s. The volunteer seemed pretty tapped out on ideas after that. I started wishing that the original gentleman that I had spoken with was there. He wasn't there that day.

I asked if the LDS Church was connected in any way to the Kolob Family Research Center in Utah that houses the Irish Records Extraction Database. They said that they did not know what that was. I can see this pop up as a result from searches for certain Irish surnames on Ancestry.com.

I stayed for about half an hour. Two volunteers tried to answer some of my questions but not much came from my visit. I have to admit my disappointment was not just with the lack of finding information but with their services. I am still suspect that they have some information that would help but do not know they have it. I do think that the LDS Family Libraries may be for beginners. If you're just getting started and only need to go back 100-150 years, they can probably help you. They do offer free classes on genealogy too. Maybe if I find some free time, I can go to one.

At least I can say that I explored this research option.